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Monday, August 21, 2017

How To Prepare For An Eclipse

There are many levels of preparedness when it comes to a total eclipse. Some of the most important things to remember are, obviously, about your personal safety and the safety of your eyes. A lot of professionals are talking about Eye Safety Cautions, and it's really important you pay attention to these warnings. If you haven't planned ahead or were not able to find a pair of approved solar eclipse viewing glasses, there are several ways you can still safely view the eclipse. Check out the NASA website for some great options.

Here at the American Red Cross we have a different level of preparedness. In addition to making sure we have our approved eye wear, we must ensure consistency of communications between ourselves, here in the Denver Red Cross office, and our team in Cheyenne, Wyoming. As thousands of people travel into Wyoming, on the hunt for the perfect spot to see the TOTAL Eclipse, the potential for the telecommunication system to be overwhelmed is a real possibility. Communication with our partners in emergency management across the state, as well as with the Red Cross teams in the field, is critical every day. One of our key responsibilities is to ensure life safety for our team, and the public, and to be able to support any potential disaster relief operation that may arise. So...we prepare.

Our team of staff and volunteers are standing by here in the Denver office, Red Cross Emergency Communications Center, where local Amature Radio (Ham Radio) operators are monitoring radio traffic and keeping an ear on things. The importance of being able to communicate is something we take pretty serious. "The American people have an expectation of the Red Cross to be operational, no matter what." says George Sullivan, Director of Community Preparedness and Resilience for the American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming. "The concern over potential outages is related more to human activity than any cosmic threat to the infrastructure, but we must always be prepared for ANY and all threats." says Sullivan. Behind the scenes we are happy to report that we will be able to respond to any call for help.

So, as you safely watch this historical moment, you can rest assured...the Red Cross is ready and able to respond to any call for assistance and will continue to alleviate human suffering in the face of any emergency that may come our way.



About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.
 

Disaster Workers Deploying to Canada Wildfires

Denver, Monday, August 21, 2017 The American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming is sending disaster workers to help with the devastating wildfires in British Columbia, Canada.

Dana Goldsmith at recent exercise in
Colorado Springs
Dana Goldsmith is a volunteer with the Red Cross of Southeastern Colorado. She has been a volunteer for more than 4 years and is an important member of the southeast Colorado team. In British Columbia, Goldsmith will serve as a member of the Staff Services team. As such she will work to ensure that other volunteers have lodging and other Red Cross support. She will travel from Colorado Springs on Tuesday, August 22.  

Heather Zoccali will travel to Kamloops, British Columbia to help with the wildfire recovery as a Client Services Specialist. As such she will help individual families as the try to recover from the devastating wildfires. Zoccali is a volunteer with the Red Cross of Northern Colorado and has deployed to large scale disasters on other occasions.

For stories and background information visit the Canadian Red Cross Blog at http://www.redcross.ca/blog/home or visit the Canadian Red Cross of British Columbia at http://www.redcross.ca/how-we-help/current-emergency-responses/british-columbia-fires, or for wildfire information visit: https://www.facebook.com/BCForestFireInfo/.

Photo courtesy BC Fire
To help the Red Cross respond to disasters like floods and wildfires donate on line by visiting www.redcross.org. You can also call 1-800-REDCROSS to make a donation.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Cat and Dog First Aid Online Course Now Available

Learn how to provide emergency care for pets until veterinary assistance is available


For more than 100 years, the American Red Cross has been training people to perform first aid skills so they could save the lives of others. Now, the organization announces the release of its new Cat and Dog First Aid online course so that owners will know what to do in an emergency until veterinary care is available.

“Millions of people learn how to respond to emergencies and save lives by enrolling in American Red Cross training programs,” said Gino Greco, CEO for Colorado and Wyoming. “Now, cat and dog owners, pet-sitters and dog walkers can take the Red Cross Cat and Dog First Aid online course and learn life-saving skills for their pets.”

People can access the course on their desktop or tablet at redcross.org/catdogfirstaid and go through the content at their own pace. It takes approximately 30 minutes to complete the course. Participants can stop and pick up where they left off if Fluffy needs a treat or it’s time to take Fido out to the dog park.

The interactive course includes:

· How to determine a pet’s normal vital signs so that owners can notice if there are any irregularities;
· Step-by-step instructions and visual aids for what to do if a pet is choking, needs CPR, has a wound, or is having a seizure; and
· Information on preventative care, health and tips for a pet’s well-being.

DOWNLOAD THE PET FIRST AID APP

The Red Cross Pet First Aid App complements the course by providing cat and dog owners with instant access to expert advice, an animal hospital locator, pet-friendly hotels, content on how to include pets in family emergency preparedness plans and more.

The app can be downloaded for free in mobile app stores or by texting ‘GETPET’ to 90999. American Pet Nutrition is a proud sponsor of the Pet First Aid App.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Taking Care of Today And Tomorrow; Gift Planning

Gay Freeman, American Red Cross Legacy Society Member
We recently had the opportunity to talk with Ms. Gay Freeman, an exceptional donor in many respects. Gay has chosen the American Red Cross as one of her most important missions to support financially. Once she made this decision, Gay educated herself about gift planning options. She decided a gift in exchange for lifetime payments back to her was the way to accomplish her goals, both personal and philanthropic. “I wanted to donate to places that would give people the ability to move through hardship and again become self-sustaining,” said Gay. This plan was tailored for her to fit both goals.

Through the Gift Planning program, Gay made a very generous gift in 2013 with a contractual agreement for the Red Cross to pay her a guaranteed, fixed sum every year for life, beginning when she reached age 65 – supplemental security for retirement. As such, she is a member of the Red Cross Legacy Society

Lori Goldstein is the Gift Planning Officer for American Red Cross in Colorado & Wyoming. She has a passion for connecting people, like Gay, to the benefits of charitable giving. "To me, the Red Cross embodies the principle of many drops together making an ocean -- both in the way our volunteers come together to provide relief in our communities and around the world, and in the way many individuals, by directing sometimes modest portions of their future estates to the Red Cross, together infuse the organization with millions of dollars to sustain this vital mission," says Lori.

When Lori joined the Red Cross in 2016, she began meeting the local Legacy Society members – those who have the foresight to plan gifts now that will support the Red Cross’s lifesaving mission in the future. During her visits she learned that Gay and her sister had been Red Cross volunteers in their youth during flood season, as well as taking Red Cross health and safety classes. Gay remained keenly aware of the Red Cross, and throughout her adult life she puts into action her strong belief in using her resources to help humanity in times of need. You can view a video of the personal interview with Gay Freeman here: American Red Cross Gift Planning 
" It’s been my privilege and pleasure to serve nonprofits and to help people connect their passion to making meaningful gifts for more than 25 years. I am honored to be part of the Red Cross team."  Lori Goldstein, American Red Cross Gift Planning Officer 

Being prepared is one of the key principles of the American Red Cross. So we consider it a privilege to help you prepare your estate plans and get your financial plans in order.  

In her own words:
video



You can learn more about this special opportunity by visiting redcrosslegacy.org, call 1-800-797-8022, ext 5. or contact Lori Goldstein directly 303-607-4704.

Monday, July 31, 2017

Red Cross helps 110 people after disasters during July 2017



American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming, July 31, 2017 — The American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming responds to calls for assistance, on average, twice to three times a day. From flooding and house fires, or damage caused by weather, Red Cross volunteers respond to provide help and hope 24 hours a day and all 7 days of the week. Of the 110 people helped by Red Cross, more than 40 were children under the age of 18, and nearly a dozen were age 60 or older.

“July has not been as busy for us as the past few months have been,” said Gino Greco, Regional CEO for Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming. “We like to think this reflects a higher level of awareness for the importance of preparedness in the communities we serve.” As part of the Red Cross mission, we continue to educate communities around fire safety and the importance of working smoke alarms, as well as general weather safety.

Breakdown of the CO & WY 87 county service area:

Mile High Area (MHC): 40 individuals received aid; Half of those who received help were under 18 years old. The MHC response area includes 10 counties in the Denver Metro area.

Southeastern Colorado Chapter (SeCO): 33 individuals received aid; 11 were under 18 years old while four were age 65 or older. The SeCO response area includes 16 counties.

Northern Colorado Chapter (NoCO): Seven individuals received aid; Four were under 18 years old. The NoCO response area includes 11 counties.

Western Colorado Chapter (WeCO): Seven individuals received aid. Three of those helped were under 18 years old. The WeCo response area covers 27 counties, serving all western Colorado and the San Luis Valley.

Wyoming Chapter: 23 individuals received aid; Seven were under age 18 with the oldest person receiving assistance being 84. The Wyoming Chapter response area covers all 23 counties that make up the state of Wyoming.

The families and individuals were provided a place to stay, money for clothes, food and medicine. Along with providing casework for the residents in a quick and efficient time frame, Red Cross volunteers will continue to provide support to these families going forward, by doing follow up work to ensure all needs are met and the individuals have a clear path to recovery from this personal disaster.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.


Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Disaster Workers Deploying to Northern Illinois Floods

Red Cross disaster workers load flood cleanup kits
that will be made available to people affected by
the northern Illinois floods. Photo credit American
Red Cross
Denver, Thursday, July 27, 2017 - The American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming is sending disaster workers to help with the devastating flooding in northern Illinois.
Rescuers visit a flooded neighborhood. Photo credit
American Red Cross


Robert Robertson is a volunteer with the Red Cross of Western Colorado. He will travel to northern Illinois to help with the flood recovery with the Client Services group. As such he will meet with flood victims to assess their needs and find resources to help them recover. Robertson previously deployed to the Wyoming flood response earlier this year.

Heather Zoccali will travel to northern Illinois to help with the flood recovery as a Disaster Assessment Specialist. As such she will help survey damage areas to help determine the resources that will be needed during recovery. Zoccali is a volunteer with the Red Cross of Northern Colorado and has deployed to large scale disasters on two other occasions.

Evan Metcalf, a volunteer with the Red Cross of the Mile High Area, will travel to Milwaukee, WI to serve as a supervisor for the Disaster Services Technology team. Evan has been a long-time volunteer for the Red Cross and has deployed to more than a dozen large-scale disasters since 2008.

To see the latest news about how you can help the Red Cross help the people that have lost everything due to the floods in Northern Illinois visit:
http://www.redcross.org/news/article/Red-Cross-Helps-Victims-of-Western-Wildfires-Midwest-Floods

To help the Red Cross respond to disasters like floods and wildfires donate on line by visiting www.redcross.org. You can also call 1-800-REDCROSS to make a donation.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Disaster Workers Heading to California Wildfires

Smoke from California Wildfires. Photo courtesy NOAA/NWS
Denver, Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - The American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming is sending disaster workers to help with the wildfires currently in California.

Dennis Hughes, with the Mile High Area Red Cross will deploy as a shelter supervisor. Hughes is currently the Disaster Program Specialist for the Mile High Area. This will be his first deployment to a large-scale disaster outside of Colorado.

Charlotte Hardy, a volunteer from Powell, WY with the Red Cross of Wyoming, will travel to California to serve as a shelter supervisor for the shelters in California. As such she will supervise shelter operations to ensure high quality service delivery for those in the shelters. Charlotte has deployed to many large-scale disasters across the country.

Corey Hixson, a volunteer from the Denver metro area, will be supporting the logistics team on the California operation, Corey is a dedicated and active volunteer with the Mile High Area and has been with the Red Cross for more than 5 years. This is his first deployment outside of the Colorado & Wyoming Region.


To see the latest news about how you can help the Red Cross help the hundreds of people that have lost everything due to the wildfires in California visit http://www.redcross.org/news/article/Red-Cross-Responds-as-Wildfires-Rage-in-California.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Here When You Need Us; No Matter Your Rank

Every day, the American Red Cross provides 24/7 global emergency communication services and support to members of the military community and their families. Through a network of volunteers and staff, we are here when you need us; no matter your rank.

Recently, we had the honor to talk with Major General Reiner, Adjutant General for Wyoming, about his experience with the Red Cross emergency communication process. Throughout his military career General Reiner has seen the process used to help his fellow service men and women, but it wasn't until he had his own personal family emergency that he got to see how the process worked first hand. As an Honorary Board Member for the Red Cross of Wyoming, General Reiner has a strong connection to the Red Cross services and knew who to call when he needed to have his daughter, who was on active duty away from home, return home when her grandmother passed away. "There is a process in place that is important, no matter what rank you get to," said General Reiner. "When you have an emergency the Red Cross provides validity and substantiates the request." Red Cross verified information assists service members and their commanding officers with making a decision regarding emergency leave.

People eligible to receive an emergency communication message include:
• Anyone on active duty in the Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force or Coast Guard
• An activated member of the Guard and Reserve of all branches of the U.S.
Armed Forces
• An immediate family member or dependent of anyone in the above categories
• A civilian employed by or under contract to the Department of Defense and
stationed outside the Continental United States and any family residing with them
at that location
• A Cadet or midshipman at a service academy; ROTC cadet on orders for training
• A Merchant Marine aboard a U.S. Naval Ship

Knowing in advance that military families will be able to reach their loved one and have access to financial and other types of assistance during an emergency brings peace of mind to families who are separated. "You know bad things happen in life and as we, in the military, are scattered all over the world it is important to have rapid and accurate information," said General Reiner. "This network of great Red Cross volunteers is here, and they're doing a great service in the states and across the nation. When you need them, they are here. You just have to make sure you know who to call."

The Red Cross has a new online option to give military families more flexibility and expanded access to help during times of crisis. People can now request help online at redcross.org/HeroCareNetwork or by calling 877-272-7337. This new and secure online option is easy to use and just like the toll free number, is available 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, from anywhere in the world. With this new online option, in addition to starting an emergency message, online users will be able to monitor the status of there message as it goes through the verification and delivery process.

The American Red Cross Hero Care App is another way we help members of the military, veterans and their families identify and access both emergency and non-emergency Red Cross services from anywhere around the world. The Hero Care App is available to download for free in app stores, by texting 'GETHEROCARE' to 90999 or by clicking the following link from a mobile device. http://3cu.be/sharehc. 

*Photo used, courtesy of Major General Reiner and family. 

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Peak 2 Fire Response


UPDATE for Peak 2 Fire: Friday, July 7, 7PM:
The Red Cross has closed the evacuation center/shelter that was opened for the Peak 2 Fire. All evacuations have been lifted and Red Cross support is no longer needed. Should the fire conditions worsen, the Red Cross stand ready to provide what ever service the community needs.

This will be the last update on the Peak 2 Fire response.
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Update for Peak 2 Fire: Friday, July 7, 2017, 2PM: 
Fire activity continues to challenge fire fighters at the Peak 2 Fire. A second fire start was spotted
near Bald Mountain and fire fighters are responding to that as well. The incident commander for the Type 1 team that is now working the fire expressed his concern. "Winds are the biggest challenge up here in this rough terrain."

The Red Cross has adjusted hours for the evacuation center at Summit Middle School. The evacuation center will be open from 8AM to 8PM as long as county officials or the Incident Command team feel it is necessary. Overnight there were no residents at the shelter. Because there appears to be little need for sheltering, the shelter will be placed on standby each night at 8 PM. If there is a need for sheltering the Red Cross can open the shelter quickly.

The chart on the left shows several links that are available to get additional fire information. It is important to remember to validate all rumors about the fire or evacuations.

To get information about evacuating your home or about preparing for wildfires visit our website at www.redcross.org/prepare. We also urge you to download our free, all hazards mobile app called Emergency. You can download it from www.redcross.org/apps or from your favorite mobile app vendor.

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Update for Peak 2 Fire: Friday, July 7, 2017, 8 AM
Fire activity continued overnight and a Type 1 Fire Team has taken responsibility for the Peak 2 Fire. This will add additional resources to the fire fight. Residents remain on mandatory evacuation and that issue will be accessed throughout the day.

Red Cross volunteer addresses the crowd at the community
meeting held at Summit Middle School. Photo by
Mike Acres/American Red Cross
Overnight there were no residents or request for accommodation at the Summit Middle School shelter. Therefore the shelter was closed at 10 PM and reopened at 8 AM Friday. Meals are not being served at the shelter. There is water, drinks and snacks available for anyone affected by the fire.

A community meeting is planned for 10 AM Friday at Summit Middle School. The meeting will be carried live on local radio stations and Facebook Live on the Red, White and Blue Fire Protection District Facebook Page

New links available for information about the Peak 2 Fire
Twitter  @Peak2Fire #Peak2Fire



See links provided below in earlier updates for additional wildfire information.
________________________________________________________________________

UPDATE for Peak 2 Fire: Thursday, July 6, 2017, 2 PM

Shelter at Summit Middle School in Frisco. Not much
activity. Photo courtesy Jace Larson, Denver 7
The Peak 2 Fire continues to cause evacuation and pre-evacuation notices in the Breckenridge area. The evacuation center/shelter remains open at Summit Middle School, 158 School Rd., Frisco, CO. Overnight three people stayed at the shelter. The Red Cross will continue to operate the evacuation center as a shelter as long as it is needed.

A press and public briefing will be held on Thursday, July 6, 2017 at 6 p.m. at Summit Middle School in Frisco. Local radio stations will carry the briefing live and on Facebook Live at
https://www.facebook.com/SummitCountyGov

Evacuated pets are being helped at the animal shelter, 58 Nancy's Pl., Frisco, CO.

For the latest fire information visit the Incident Information System at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5321/

For the latest information from Summit County visit: http://www.co.summit.co.us/emergencyblog
Wildfire preparedness and safety tips are available at www.redcross.org/prepare.

How can you help? The best way to help is to donate to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief to help the Red Cross be ready for to help those in need during emergencies, You can donate on line at www.redcross.org, by calling 1-800-redcross, or texting the word redcross to 90999.

What supplies do we need? Currently we have sufficient supplies for those in need. Do not bring in-kind donations to the Red Cross shelter. If supplies are needed a broadcast of that need will be made through traditional and social media.



__________________________________________________________________________


Update for Peak 2 Fire shelter: 9 PM, Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Peak 2 Fire Late Wednesday afternoon.
Photo credite:USFS
The evacuation center located at Summit Middle School in Frisco, CO will be open overnight to provide temporary housing for those affected by the Peak 2 Fire. As of 9 PM one family (2A/1C) have signed into the shelter. Breakfast will be served at the Summit Middle School around 8 AM Thursday. A community meeting is tentatively planned for 10 AM Thursday at the shelter location.

The Red Cross stands ready to support the community through this emergency. We have teams on standby in case there are additional calls for Red Cross support.

Fire conditions and weather forecasts continue to drive the fire that is burning in an area of significant beetle kill. Please stay tuned to local media for the latest information or visit http://www.co.summit.co.us/emergencyblog for the latest evacuation orders.

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The Red Cross has opened an evacuation shelter for people affected by the Peak 2 Fire in Summit County. If you are evacuated please go to Summit Middle School, 158 School Rd, Frisco, CO.

NOTE: The best source for fire information is
http://www.co.summit.co.us/emergencyblog .

Here are some quick wildfire safety tips. Additional tips are available at redcross.org/prepare.


Nearly 270 people helped after disasters in June

American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming, July 3, 2017 — The American Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming responded to calls for assistance, on average, twice to three times a day to disasters of all types. From flooding and house fires, to the collapsed roofs of two apartment buildings in Lakewood, CO.  Of the 269 people
helped by Red Cross, more than 50 were children under the age of 18, while several of those assisted were age 65 or older.

“This month, as volunteers were responding to help our community on Father’s Day, we are reminded that disaster knows no holiday and can strike at any time,” said Gino Greco, Regional CEO for Red Cross of Colorado & Wyoming.

Breakdown of the CO & WY 87 county service area:
Mile High Chapter (MHC): 153 individuals received aid; more than 25 were under 18 years old. The MHC response area includes 10 counties in the Denver Metro area.

Southeastern Colorado Chapter (SeCO): 29 individuals received aid; Seven were under 18 years old while three were age 65 or older. The SeCO response area includes 16 counties.

Northern Colorado Chapter (NoCO): Nine individuals received aid; Four were under 18 years old and two were age 65 or older. The NoCO response area includes 11 counties.

Western Colorado Chapter (WeCO): 61 individuals received aid. 15 of those helped were under 18 years old. The WeCo response area covers 27 counties, serving all western Colorado and the San Luis Valley.

Wyoming Chapter: 17 individuals received aid; Five were under age 18. The Wyoming Chapter response area covers all 23 counties that make up the state of Wyoming.

The families and individuals were provided a place to stay, money for clothes, food and medicine. Along with providing casework for the residents in a quick and efficient time frame, Red Cross volunteers will continue to provide support to these families going forward, by doing follow up work to ensure all needs are met and the individuals have a clear path to recovery from this personal disaster.


Sunday, July 2, 2017

Red Cross Issues Top Summer and 4th of July Safety Steps

This summer, and specifically as we near the Fourth of July holiday, many people will be traveling, firing up the backyard grill or enjoying fireworks, and the American Red Cross offers a series of steps everyone can follow to safely enjoy the holiday.
 
Photo Credit: James Ford White Photography
“Everyone looks forward to having fun over the summer, and this Fourth of July the Red Cross wants to make sure people know how to stay safe while enjoying the holiday,” said Nigel Holderby, Regional Communication Director for Red Cross in Colorado & Wyoming.

HIGHWAY SAFETY Millions of people will be on the highways over the summer. The Red Cross offers these five things everyone should do to stay safe while traveling:
  1. Buckle seat belts, observe speed limits.
  2. Do not drink and drive.
  3. Pay full attention to the road – don’t use a cell phone to call or text.
  4. Use caution in work zones.
  5. Clean the vehicle’s lights and windows to help the driver see, especially at night. Turn the headlights on as dusk approaches, or during inclement weather.

FIREWORKS SAFETY The best way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. In dry conditions, fireworks can lead to wildfires, and many cities and communities have laws that make them illegal. Check local city or county websites for any restrictions in your community. 

If fireworks are allowed, here are five safety steps for people setting fireworks off at home:

  1. Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
  2. Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
  3. Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
  4. Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight "a dud."
  5. Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.

GRILLING SAFETY Every year people are injured while using charcoal or gas grills. Here are several steps to safely cook up treats for the backyard barbecue:
  1. Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  2. Never grill indoors – not in the house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
  3. Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
  4. Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck or apartment balcony, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire. 
  5. Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.

RED CROSS APPS People can download the all-inclusive Red Cross Emergency app which combines more than 35 emergency alerts to help keep the user safe. And there is a special mobile app - Monster Guard - designed for kids, teaching them to prepare for emergencies at home by playing an engaging game. Users can find the apps in smartphone app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.


About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit
redcross.org or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

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